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  1. #21
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    Ổng chiên ngịp mấy dzụ này mà lão Nị

  2. #22
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    Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF5



    The GF5 is the fourth in Panasonic's range of small-bodied 'GF' Micro Four Thirds cameras, and sits below the G3 in the current lineup. The differences between the GF5 and its predecessor are relatively few, and we doubt they'll prove significant enough to tempt any GF3 users to upgrade. But they do combine to make the new camera a more attractive proposition to compact upgraders than the GF3.

    The GF3 wasn't well terribly well received by photo enthusiasts at launch. In part this was because it continued the process of repositioning the GF series as a super-point-and-shoot, rather than a GF1-style enthusiast's camera. Since then, however, those needs have fulfilled by the GX1, while the arrival of Olympus' PEN Mini and Nikon's 1 J1 have made it clear that Panasonic isn't alone in believing there's a market for a small, simple and inexpensive mirrorless camera. With the benefit of this context, the GF5's role is clear - to put large-sensor image quality into the hands of people looking to upgrade from their compact camera.

    With this in mind, Panasonic is pushing a kit that bundles the GF5 with its extremely compact retractable X Vario PZ 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS power zoom lens. The combination is impressively small for a camera that offers near-DSLR capabilities and is the closest any mirrorless camera comes to being pocketable when combined with a zoom lens.

    Physically, the most obvious change is a new rubber hand grip, which improves on the rather slick, uncoated grip of the GF3, and a new texture to the body shell. Under the hood, the GF5's newly developed 12MP CMOS sensor is an evolution of the one used in the GF3, but with improved circuitry that doesn't block as much light entering the photosite, giving better low light performance. The image processor is also different, and Panasonic promises that the latest version of its Venus Engine will deliver improved noise performance. These factors, combined with a noise reduction system that treats highlights and shadows differently (since the dominant cause of the noise differs between the two regions), has emboldened Panasonic to offer a boost to the camera's ISO range, with it now being extendable to 12800, rather than the GF3's 6400.

    Also slightly improved is the GF5's continuous shooting rate, from 3.8 fps to 4 fps, but more significant are a major bump in resolution for the touch-sensitive rear LCD, and change of video file format offered. With the GF5, you have the option to shoot in the MP4 format, as well as the now-standard (for Panasonic) AVCHD. Video clips shot in the MP4 format are easier to work with, because they're created as a single file, rather than a being split across a complex file structure, separate from your stills. MPEG 4 files are far more widely compatible when it comes to playback. As such, we think MP4 makes a lot more sense for an entry-level camera.

    Improved touch screen



    The GF5's rear LCD is now 920,000 dots, which matches the best-in class, and means that everything from menu navigation to image composition and review just looks that little bit sharper. The touch-screen interface has also been tweaked and improved. The addition of a hard button for 'Display' on the back of the camera, for instance, means the GF5 doesn't need to have any virtual buttons impeding your view as you shoot.

    Other improvements are more subtle - the GF5 gains eight new filter options in its Creative Control Mode (namely Soft Focus, Dynamic Monochrome, Impressive Art, One Point Color, Cross Process and Star Filter) and filter effects can be previewed before they are applied. A further refinement for filter fans comes when the GF5 is set to intelligent Auto or intelligent Auto Plus mode. The camera will now suggest filter effects that it thinks might enhance your photo, based on analysis of the scene.

    Panasonic's press release talks excitedly about a selection of professional photographs used to illustrate the types of photo the camera can be set to take, but the reality is a fairly standard icon-based interface for selecting between scene modes. These do at least include a couple of shooting tips and an explanation of what the mode is actually doing to the camera's settings.

    Panasonic GF5 specification highlights

    • 12.1MP Live MOS sensor
    • ISO 160-6400 (extendable to 12800)
    • '3DNR' three-dimensional noise reduction system
    • 3.0", 920k dot touch-sensitive LCD
    • Full AVCHD 1080/60i video (from 30fps sensor output) with MP4 recording option
    • Stereo microphones
    • Built-in orientation sensor
    • 14 Creative Control filter effects options
    • Scene Guide mode with 23 modes


    Design & Operation



    The GF5's design and operation are extremely similar to the GF3 to the extent that ever since taking delivery of our pre-production GF5 we've been muddling the two cameras up in the dpreview office. Like the GF3, the GF5's touch-sensitive LCD screen is central to the camera's operation and compared to higher-end G-series models like the G1X, the GF5's control layout feels positively spartan.

    Or, to look at it another way, it looks a lot like a compact camera. The zoom lever might be on the lens, but in most other respects, the GF5 shouldn't be too off-putting for its target user, coming up from a small-sensor point-and-shoot. The lack of buttons isn't problematic, though, even if you do step away from its automated modes - the touch screen generally combines well with the physical controls to give plenty of access to settings if you want to change them.



    It's only when you get it into your hand that you realize just how small the GF5 and retractable kit lens are together. The little rubber thumb rest on the back of the camera and the light weight of the lens means you can genuinely shoot one-handed, just as long as you don't need to zoom (though we'd still always recommend a two-handed grip for extra stability).

    Compared to the Panasonic DMC-GF3



    As you can see from these comparison images, the GF5 is very closely related to its predecessor the GF3 in terms of design and operational ergonomics. The most significant differences are a new, higher-resolution LCD screen and a more substantial rubber hand grip, which we think is a big improvement over the somewhat slippery grip on the front of the GF3.

    The GF5 also gains an additional 'Display' button on the rear, meaning that no touch screen 'buttons' have to clutter the screen while shooting.

    Compared to the Olympus PEN E-PL3



    Like its predecessors the GF5 is designed as a crossover product for photographers coming from compact cameras, as an entry-point into Panasonic's growing 'G' series Micro Four Thirds cameras. As such, it's small, lightweight, and inexpensive, and when paired with the ultra-compact Lumix G X Vario PZ 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH Power OIS kit lens, the GF5 is about as close to offering truly compact camera ergonomics as we've seen in an interchangeable lens camera.

    http://www.dpreview.com/previews/panasonicdmcgf5

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  4. #23
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    Nhìn body của GF1 với cái vòng Mode Dial thấy hay hơn cái touch-screen của GF5.

  5. #24
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    @Chó Gặm: em chơi cái GF1 đi rồi nhường lại anh cái máy cũ

  6. #25
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    Quote Được gửi bởi Dê Lỳ View Post
    @Chó Gặm: em chơi cái GF1 đi rồi nhường lại anh cái máy cũ
    Em thử qua GF1, GF2 rồi thấy nên tiếp tục với LX3 hay hơn anh ơi.

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  8. #26
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    Với chiến thuật hiện nay của Panasonic thì mục tiêu của dòng GF (gồm GF2, GF3, và GF5) không còn là high-end nữa, mà là nhắm đến những ai đang muốn upgrade lên từ Point & Shoot, vậy cho nên mẫu mã bị thay đổi và các features giảm bớt đi để gần gũi với nhóm này hơn, chứ không còn hơi hướm retro đặc biệt như là GF1.

    Trong khi đó, những ai hiện đang sở hữu chiếc GF1 rồi mà muốn nâng cấp lên model mới và xịn hơn thì sự lựa chọn chính là chiếc GX1.

    ----

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1



    Panasonic's Lumix DMC-GX1 is the company's latest addition to its G-series lineup. And although the camera bears the '1' appendage in its model name, it is clear from even a cursory glance that with the GX1, Panasonic has provided the long-awaited spiritual successor to the highly regarded Lumix DMC-GF1. Of perhaps even greater significance, the move to introduce a separate GX product line (as opposed to releasing the camera as a 'GF4') would seem to suggest a long-term commitment by the camera maker to meet the demands of enthusiasts who embraced the GF1.

    Launched back in 2009, the GF1 was, ironically, Panasonic's attempt to court compact-camera owners looking to upgrade, with what was then billed as, 'the world's smallest, lightest interchangeable lens camera'. Instead, the GF1's high quality Raw output and classic rangefinder aesthetic gained a strong and passionate following in the enthusiast market. DSLR owners looking for a second 'go-anywhere' camera with high image quality embraced the camera's comprehensive external controls and its relatively compact Micro Four Thirds lens offerings.

    It is precisely these users who have been disappointed twice over with the Lumix DMC-GF2 and Lumix DMC-GF3 releases. These cameras departed from the GF1's retro styling and button-driven operation. Instead, they favored ever-smaller form factors, and design cues that pointed unambiguously to users who may be turned off by an overly complex (and expensive) camera, including increasing reliance on touchscreen controls. With the GX1 Panasonic is aiming squarely at more advanced users for whom the GF1 struck a pleasing balance between size and operability.

    Of course, the competition for these users has grown much stiffer today, and Panasonic recognizes that if it wants to expand the camera's appeal, the GX1 must offer advantages not only to the GF series but to a crowded market that includes strong APS-C sensor competition from both Sony and Samsung. To this end, the GX1 employs the same 16MP sensor we first saw in the Lumix DMC-G3, although with image processing adjustments that allow for a top ISO of 12,800.

    A brand new viewfinder, the DMW-LVF2 has been introduced alongside the GX1. With a higher magnification and resolution, the LVF2 is a noticeable improvement over its predecessor, the LVF1. Crucially though, a new spec and connector makes the LVF2 incompatible with any GF models; neither is it possible to fit the LVF1 on the GX1. Faster communication between the camera and lenses helps the GX1 focus even faster than the 120Hz sensor readout allowed in the preceding G3 and GF3 models, with Panasonic claiming a 10% improvement.

    Panasonic's well-regarded touchscreen interface has also gotten some new tricks, with a level gauge and clever Touch Tab icon that allows you to hide, reveal (and of course activate) a small panel of menu options directly on-screen. Another very welcome feature is the inclusion of an orientation sensor that automatically rotates vertical images even when captured with non-OIS lenses.

    The GX1 is being made available in both black and silver bodies. Unlike previous GF models, none of the GX1's kit options includes a fixed focal length lens. Instead, the kit lens options are limited to just two; the Lumix G X Vario PZ 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH Power OIS zoom lens and the more conventional (and less expensive) Lumix G Vario 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS lens.

    By creating a separate product line for the GX, Panasonic has made clear distinctions in its G-series offerings. The GF line is positioned as entry point for compact-camera upgraders. The GH2 is designed for users who shoot a lot of video and the G3 is aimed for (primarily) still shooters who desire a built-in EVF and articulated LCD. The GX1 then is rather sensibly positioned as an enthusiast offering for those who want the highest image quality from a Micro Four Thirds camera, in a form factor that comfortably accommodates a range of zoom lenses and does not skimp on external controls.

    Panasonic GX1 specification highlights

    • 16MP Micro Four Thirds sensor
    • ISO 160-12,800
    • Orientation sensor (providing information with non-OIS lenses)
    • 3.0", 460k dot LCD
    • Full AVCHD 1080/60i video (from 30fps sensor output)
    • Continuous shooting up to 20fps (at reduced resolution)
    • Electronic level gauge
    • Four available Fn buttons (two onscreen)


    Differences between the GX1 and the GF1

    • Higher resolution sensor (16MP vs 12MP)
    • Touchscreen interface
    • Much-improved screen coatings for better visibility in bright light
    • Faster AF acquisition times
    • Top ISO of 12,800 (vs 3200)
    • Continuous full resolution shooting at 4fps (vs 3fps)
    • Higher burst depth in Raw mode (11 vs 5)
    • AVCHD 1080/60i video (vs 720p AVCHD Lite format)
    • Built-in stereo microphones
    • Electronic level gauge
    • Two additional Fn buttons
    • No drive mode lever


    Compared to the Samsung NX200



    The Panasonic DMC-GX1 is taller than the Samsung NX200, which actually houses a larger APS-C sensor. The GX1's mode dial sits atop the camera plate as opposed to the recessed profile found on the NX200.



    From this top view you can see that the GX1 packs more control points along the camera's top plate, which maintains a traditional rangefinder-inspired shape compared to the more aggressively contoured design of the NX200.

    What's not evident in the images above is just how much more heft the GX1 has in comparison to the NX200. With a solid metal body construction that weighs in at nearly 320g without a lens, the GX1 feels in hand rather substantial, in a way that calls to mind not only the GF1, but classic film camera bodies.

    Compared to the Sony NEX-7


    The GX1 appears almost svelte in comparison to Sony's NEX-7, with significantly less bulk in the handgrip.



    One of the more obvious distinctions here is the built-in EVF on the Sony NEX-7, whose forward-thinking design only reinforces the more traditional classic-camera aesthetic of the GX1.

    Although the GX1 has slightly smaller dimensions in both width and depth, it's worth remembering that that Sony has managed to pack a built-in EVF, articulating LCD and of course an APS-C sensor into the NEX-7. The GX1's more conventional control point layout stands in sharp contrast to the sleek, hewn-from-a block-of-granite design of the NEX-7. Both cameras offer a sure, firm grip, although users with larger hands may find one-handed shooting slightly less comfortable with the lower profile handgrip of the GX1.

    Body & Design



    The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 carries forward the form factor and styling that garnered the GF1 such a strong following among enthusiasts. Going against the current trend of sleek, minimal styling and gently sloped edges, the GX1's rectangular shape, prominent mode dial and abundance of control points are clearly designed to appeal to users who place a priority on manual control over contemporary styling.

    External similarities aside, the GX1 is much more than just a refresh of the GF1. It comes as no surprise that it builds on many of the advances Panasonic has incorporated into recent models, most notably the well-regarded touchscreen interface first seen in the GF2. Autofocus can be achieved simply by touching anywhere along the LCD with the added ability to adjust the size of the focus point on the fly. A customizeable Q.Menu gives easy onscreen access to as many as 15 camera settings. Touch Tab is a brand new feature that provides an onscreen dock for up to five control and display functions that can be expanded or hidden with a single touch.

    While previous advances in Panasonic's touchscreen interface were accompanied by the elimination of external control points, the GX1 offers a very compelling balance between external and onscreen camera control. You can operate the GX1 with minimal touchscreen operation or, if you prefer, can setup the Q.Menu and two onscreen Fn buttons to reduce or eliminate the use of most hard buttons. While users opting to employ both methods of control will reap the most in terms of efficiency, it is refreshing to see such an equitably presented set of options.

    Compared to the DMC-GF1

    As the images below attest, there is precious little in the way of size, form factor and styling to separate the GX1 from its spiritual predecessor, the GF1. Indeed, when resting the two side-by-side in our office, it's not been uncommon for us to inadvertently pick up the wrong camera.

    Perhaps the largest and certainly most noticeable design change is the GX's1 more pronounced, textured rubber handgrip offers a more secure hold of the camera. Some control points have been rearranged, but a GF1 user would feel right at home.



    The GX1 is measurably, though inconsequentially smaller than the GF1 in width, height and depth. The flash on the GX1 extends roughly six millimeters lower than that of the GF1. And while the GX1's flash may appear more powerful, with a higher guide number (7.6m vs 6m) at base ISO, this is purely because the GX1 has a higher base ISO sensitivity of 160 compared to the GF1's ISO 100.



    In this rear view it becomes apparent just how little button and dial placement have changed. What has been updated is the touchscreen LCD with Touch AF and a much-improved screen coating that offers increased visibility in bright sunlight. The GX1's EVF connector socket is wider to accommodate the new, optional LVF2 viewfinder, which is obviously not compatible with the GF1.



    The GX1 deploys a stereo mic just forward of the hotshoe. It also replaces the iAuto mode dial setting with a button. The loss of a movie mode dial setting, however, takes with it the ability to easily frame a video in 16:9 format before recording; the best you can do is assign the 'Rec. Area' option to a Fn button. The GX1 will honor exposure compensation and the WB setting when recording video as well the currently selected Photo Style. The drive mode selector found on the GF1 is moved to the rear of the camera as one of the cardinal points on the 4-way controller.

    Compared to the DMC-GF3


    Users waiting for a GF1-style update found little in the GF3 that would make for a sensible upgrade, with the latter's paucity of on-body controls and reliance on the touchscreen for most of its operation. At a glance, it is easy to see that these cameras are intended for two distinctly different audiences. The GF3's gently sloping curves and compact camera-like appearance contrast sharply with the austere, utilitarian styling of the GX1.



    The GX1 is significantly larger than the GF3 in both height and width. While the GF3 is designed to appeal to users upgrading from a compact camera, the GX1 puts forth a rangefinder aesthetic that much more likely resonates with the enthusiast consumer, whose notion of camera size is likely based on the use of a DSLR.



    The abundance of control points available on the GX1 sits in stark contrast to the GF3 which virtually demands use of the camera's touchscreen interface for all but the most basic of camera controls.



    The GX1 offers a mode dial, stereo microphone, hotshoe and a built-in flash positioned to reduce the occurrence of red eye, as well as shadows caused by the barrel of longer lenses.

    Compared to the DMC-G3

    It is fair to summarize the GX1 as a GF1 body with the internal specs of a G3. Virtually all of the features that were new in the G3 have worked their way into the GX1, not least the 16MP Micro Four Thirds sensor. The GX1 does introduce a few new tricks of its own, such as an ISO of 12,800 and an onscreen level gauge.



    While the two cameras have distinct differences in both style and handling, they share many of the same internal specifications. Virtually all of the G3's extra bulk comes from a built-in EVF; an optional accessory on the GX1.



    As this top-down view makes clear, the GX1 takes up significantly less space in a camera bag, though it is certainly not pocketable with the non-collapsible kit zoom.



    Pair the GX1 with the 14-42 power zoom kit lens and this combination has a shallower depth than the body of the G3, due mainly to the latter's overhanging viewfinder.

    Body elements



    The headline spec of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 is a 16MP Micro Four Thirds 'Live MOS' sensor. The ISO range extends from 160 to 12,800.



    The GX1's built-in flash uses a double-hinged design and sits well to the side of the lens axis. The flash head extends 24mm above the camera's top plate and has a Guide No. of 7.6m at ISO 160.

    While not designed for this (do so at your own risk), the flash can be locked into place with the head pointing up for bounce flash, as shown on our photographic tests page.



    Located beneath the hot shoe is the electronic port by which the optional LVF (Live Viewfinder) is connected to the camera. You are unable to attach both an external flash and LVF simultaneously.



    The GX1 records Full HD movies with 1080/60i capture from 30p sensor output.

    Sound recording comes courtesy of a pair of stereo microphones on the top plate. A choice of four microphone input levels can be made and a digital wind cut filter can be enabled in an Auto mode via the movie menu. But there's no option to use an external mic.



    The camera controls on the top plate consist of a mode dial, power switch, shutter release, movie record and iAuto buttons.

    The layout most closely resembles that of the GF1, with the exception of a drive mode switch whose functionality has been moved to the rear of the camera and the addition of an iAuto button which replaces the mode dial position it occupied on the GF1.



    The GX1 provides no less than seven control points along the right side of the camera in addition to a 4-way controller.

    The external Fn1 and Fn2 buttons are augmented by two additional onscreen Fn buttons, each of which can be configured to control any one of 27 separate camera functions. Should you be so inclined you can even assign the same functionality to multiple buttons.



    A textured handgrip with a significantly higher profile than any GF-series model provides a firm, secure grip of the camera.



    The LVF2 is a new optional viewfinder with a 1,440,000-dot equivalent resolution. Much like the previous LVF1, the viewfinder can be tilted 90 degrees to accommodate low-camera angle shooting. The LVF2 has a new connector size and is not compatible with older G-series cameras.

    You cannot connect an external flash and the LVF simultaneously.



    The GX1's connector ports are located along the right side of the body and are covered by a flexible plastic flap. There is a remote socket, HDMI port and a mini USB slot that doubles as a monoaural AV output.

    Unlike the GH-series cameras, the remote connector socket doesn't do double-duty as a microphone connector.



    The GX1 ships with the same Li-ion DMW-BLD10 battery (7.3Wh) found in the G3 and GF2 models. The battery has a CIPA rating of 310 images when used with the 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 power zoom kit lens.

    As with most previous G-series models, the SD/SDHC/SDXC compatible slot shares a compartment with the battery port.

    Operation and Controls

    The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 offers a unique handling and operational experience, not out of sheer innovation, but in large part due to its combination of internal specs and external design found in the G3 and GF1 models respectively. The AF system is fast and reliable; among the best we've seen from any G-series model. The abundance of external control points along with a responsive and intuitive touchscreen interface make the GX1 a very pleasant camera to use, whether you are changing exposure settings between shots or tweaking menu options to tailor the camera's behavior to your liking. Users of any current G-series camera will feel right at home navigating the camera's menu structure which is laid out in a sensible, if not particularly efficient tab-based multiple page interface. Yet, with so may options that can be accessed either through the Q.Menu or one of four Fn buttons, trips to the menu system can be relatively infrequent.

    Top of camera controls



    Along the GX1's top plate lay the mode dial and power switch, in an arrangement identical to that found on the G3. Both controls offer resistance stiff enough to minimize inadvertent actuation when handling the camera. The shutter button provides positive feedback upon a half-press and the movie record button, while positioned very near to the shutter release is recessed into the camera plate to avoid accidental operation. The i(intelligent)Auto button toggles between the shooting mode currently set on the camera dial and either standard iAuto or iAuto Plus, depending on how its menu option has been configured.

    Rear of camera controls



    The rear of the camera offers a multitude of control points surrounding a familiar 3.0 inch 460,000 dot LCD, with the thumb wheel, AF/AE lock and playback controls most easily accessible with your hand in the shooting position. The thumb wheel copies the smaller diameter design found on the G3, and thus requires slightly more rotations when navigating through page-heavy menu screens. This is by no means a huge issue, but around the dpreview office, those used to larger thumb dials felt a noticeable difference.

    The 4-way controller continues with recent Panasonic tradition (with the notable exception of the GF3 and its integrated dial) with ISO, WB, drive mode and AF mode controls surrounding the menu button. The AF/MF focus mode button makes a return, having been shelved after the GF1 was replaced.

    The metal buttons and 4-way controller mimic those in Panasonic's premium compact models, like the Lumix DMC-LX5, right down to the silver-on-silver button labelling which is impossible to read in low light. We are thankful the GX1's buttons have not also been subjected to the same degree of miniaturization. Nevertheless, users migrating from the GF1 will find noticeably smaller control points on the GX1. In addition, its Fn1, Disp., Q.Menu and AF/MF buttons all sit flush with the camera plate. While this obviously helps to minimize accidental operation, some may find it that much more difficult to purposely engage them, particularly when wearing even the thinnest of gloves.

    The Q.Menu button resides near the bottom of the rear plate, perhaps not the most convenient location for what we've long found to be a frequently used control point. All but the most dextrous of users will have to shift their hand from the shooting position to comfortably reach it. It would seem reasonable enough to switch its position with the Disp. button, as we'd guess that most users will access that button less frequently.

    Minor quibbles aside, it's hard to find much fault with such an extensive set of external controls. What is perhaps most interesting is that the evolution of Panasonic's touchscreen interface, including a new Touch Tab feature, has made nearly all of the functionality of external controls available via the LCD screen. The GX1 provides an equivalent operational experience for those who prefer a touchscreen as well as those who would rather press external buttons.

    Samples:





































    Panasonic DMC-GX1 Review: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicdmcgx1

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  10. #27
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    Quote Được gửi bởi Arkain View Post
    ...có nhiều dòng thậm chí còn là anh em sinh đôi nữa cơ
    Nhưng phải trả 2 giá khác nhau. Bây giờ mấy hãng làm ống kính của Đức đều có mấy ông Nhật "cộng tác" như Leica có Panasonic, Sony có Carl Zeiss ... còn anh Samsung thì hình như "chơi với" một hãng khác, tên gì đó, quên rồi. Để ý ngay cái body của Panasonic cũng có cái logo Laica.

  11. #28
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    Xem ra Panasonic quyết tâm theo đuổi dòng M4-3, thôi ráng chờ nó ra nhiều nhiều ống kiếng với giá xuống thấp thấp rồi kiếm 1 cái đi chụp gái teen.

  12. #29
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    Không chừng có nhiều lão tướng nhiều năm lăn lộn trong làng nhiếp ảnh sau khi rửa tay gác kiếm thì lại bán hết cái mớ đại liên cồng kềnh nặng như tạ kia đi và chuyển qua xài tiểu liên Micro Four Thirds để có thể nhàn nhã ngao du tứ hải

  13. #30
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    Quote Được gửi bởi Arkain View Post
    Không chừng có nhiều lão tướng nhiều năm lăn lộn trong làng nhiếp ảnh sau khi rửa tay gác kiếm thì lại bán hết cái mớ đại liên cồng kềnh nặng như tạ kia đi và chuyển qua xài tiểu liên Micro Four Thirds để có thể nhàn nhã ngao du tứ hải
    Sáng qua ngồi uống ca phe với cu Gà. Trứớc khi làm 1 chuyến du lịch dài ngày, chú nó quyết định chia tay với cái này



    Lý do: cồng kềnh quá, hổng tiện và đang tìm loại máy nhỏ gọn hơn. Bó tay luôn

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